Thursday, June 7, 2018

African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans

For male and female populations in 2016, blacks were 8.4 times more likely than whites to be diagnosed with HIV, whereas in 2005 they were 7.9 times more likely. Specifically, the number of black males diagnosed with the disease in 2005 was 9,969 and increased by 29% to 12,890 in 2016. Black male-to-male sexual contact was the most common form of transmission of HIV and the number of men that have sex with men who were diagnosed with HIV increased 154% from 4,020 in 2005 to 10,233 in 2016. If this trend continues, one in two black men who engage in sexual contact with men will receive an HIV diagnosis in their lifetimes. The number of African-American females diagnosed with HIV through heterosexual contact increased by 75% from 2,392 in 2005 to 4,189 in 2016, and there was also a 76% increase in HIV diagnoses among heterosexual black men in the same time period.

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